ONKEL TOM`S DIXIE BAND, Fuchs du hast die Gans gestohlen, 1960

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In the 1950s, there was fierce controversy among jazz fans, over whether you liked modern jazz or Dixieland. Unfortunately, the question was never, if you liked to dance or not. Of course a lot of people actually liked both, but somehow, over time, the modern fans won. They convinced everyone, that modern jazz was for the smart progressive people, and trad jazz was for the conservative dummies. When the snobs declared jazz an academic art form, and made everybody sit down, they killed it.

Today, the swing dancing scene has embraced trad jazz. Sometimes, jazz musicians see their audience dance to their music again, for the first time after decades. As generic as lot of trad jazz was in the 50s, at least it was still popular dance music. So popular, that even the most commercially-driven budget labels were dishing out jazz records.

Anyway, just found this 45 a few days ago, with  no sleeve and quite beat up. Two instrumental versions of folk songs that are in the public domain, recorded by a pseudonymous band for a short-lived, long-defunct, cheapo label, make this perfect blog material, according to the rules.

Fuchs, du hast die Gans gestohlen is a German children´s song.

This is “bad” jazz.  I like it!

ONKEL TOM`S DIXIE BAND, Fuchs, du hast die Gans gestohlen, 1960

Muss i denn zum Städele hinaus is a traditional German folk song. Elvis recorded it in 1960.  The Feetwarmers (with Klaus Doldinger on clarinet!) were voted “Best Traditional Band” at the Amateur Jazz Festival in Düsseldorf in 1960, and recorded an instrumental version of the song on their first single for Odeon, that same year.

The Favorit label´s cash-in version is not that bad in comparison…

ONKEL TOM`S DIXIE BAND, Muss i denn zum Städele hinaus, 1960



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